The Tenderloin

Nestled between the Civic Center to the south, the prestigious Nob Hill to the north, and sitting west of Market Street, you will find the very well-located and derelict community called the Tenderloin.  After the 1906 Earthquake and Fire, this area was rebuilt with tourist hotels, theaters, churches, and apartments.  Since World War II, the area has declined and is now notorious for drug deals, crime, and prostitution.  In recent years, it has begun the “gentrification” process and slowly the neighborhood is being rehabilitated.  The area called the Tender Nob is a perfect example of this.  As the buildings get redone and more and more respectable businesses begin to populate the area, the city loses one of its very few areas where someone of moderate to low-income can find affordable rent.

There are two reasons why it is called the Tenderloin.  First, it is referred to as the underbelly of the city.  Second, in previous times cops were paid quite a bit more money to walk the streets of this area, and they were then able to buy the best cuts, or most tender cuts, of meat.  Some say that the cops were also given deals on these cuts of meat by the merchants in the area because they wanted police protection.

According to Wikipedia, the Tenderloin is also famous for the following:

*  Rae Bourbon,  female impersonator, was arrested in 1933.  At the time, he was broadcasting live from Tait’s Cafe at 44 Ellis Street his show entitled, “Boys will be Girls.”

* In August 1966 at Compton’s Cafeteria (Turk & Taylor Streets), one of the first gay riots occurred.  Police were in the process of arresting a drag queen, and it erupted into civil disobedience.  This riot pre-dated the famous Stonewall Riot in New York City.

*  The movie and book, The Maltese Falcon, are based on San Francisco’s Tenderloin.

Most guide books will not tell you about this area of the city, even though it is almost a stones throw from so many tourist places in the city.  They do this area an injustice.  Some of the safer areas of this region have fantastic restaurants, coffee shops, and theaters.  Cafe Royale, Brenda’s French & Soul Food,
Exit Theatre, Golden Gate Theatre, Dottie’s Cafe, and Hooker’s Sweet Treats are just a few of the locally owned, successful businesses that make the trek into this area well worth it.

For more information on the Tenderloin, check out the blog called “The Tender,” at http://thetender.us/

Sincerely,

Mike

Comments Off on The Tenderloin

Filed under San Francisco, San Francisco History, Uncategorized

San Francisco Iconic Pics

Comments Off on San Francisco Iconic Pics

Filed under Uncategorized

North Beach

This area of the city is nestled near Chinatown and Fisherman’s Wharf, and has a long history as the Italian section of San Francisco. By the 1930’s, one tenth of the city’s population was Italian. It was home to Italian notables like the great chocolatier, Domingo Ghirardelli; and that baseball sensation, Joe Di Maggio. In fact, Joe renewed his wedding vows to the beautiful Marilyn Monroe on the steps located in front of the Church of Saints Peter and Paul. This is the one of the few churches, if the only church in America, with the street number 666. No kidding.

North Beach was settled in the late 1800’s and received its name because it was the Northern waterfront. Because of landfill and new construction, this characteristic of the area changed drastically over the past 100 years. San Francisco is always trying to find new ways to add livable space to this tip of the peninsula community.

The area thrived after the 1906 Earthquake and Fire. In fact, three and four-story Edwardian homes appeared magically all over the area in order to offer cheap housing near the bay. Many of these structures are still around today, and they definitely add to the charming appeal of the neighborhood.

Eventually it became home to the Beatnik culture, and places like Vesuvio, Specs, and other businesses which encouraged radical self-expression popped up all over the area. This is also the place where you will find City Lights Bookstore which boasts one of the largest collections of Beat literature and history.

Finally, the area also was, and is, a center for nightlife. Walking down the streets at twilight you can smell the Italian food from the restaurants, hear the music of live bands seeping out into the streets, and you can even check out a peep-show. Starting in 1964, people rushed to North Beach and caused traffic jams in order to see the topless dancer, Carol Doda, perform at the Condor Club. Shocking!

North Beach is a magical place, and best experienced in the early evening on into the night.

Cheers!

 

Mike

Source: San Francisco: A Cultural History, Mick Sinclair (This is an awesome book, and I highly recommend it.)

 

Comments Off on North Beach

Filed under San Francisco Art, San Francisco History, San Francisco Living, San Francisco Tourist

“Cupid’s Span”

"Cupid's Span"

You are walking along the Embarcadero enjoying the views which include the Bay Bridge, Yerba Buena Island, Treasure Island, and far off Oakland; ships are docked in the bay, and a multitude of sail boats are racing all around.  Everything seems nice, laid back, and predictable until…you look up ahead and you see a giant, yes giant, bow and arrow sticking half way up out of the ground.  Surprise!  You have just found Cupid’s Arrow.  (You can check that off the scavenger hunt list.

Designed by the international artists Claus Oldenberg and Coosje Van Brugen’s, “Cupid’s Span” was erected in 2003  in the new Rincon Park on the corner of the Embarcadero & Folsom Street.  These same artists created “Spoonbridge and Cherry” in Minneapolis, and “Saw Sawing” in Japan.  They are worth a “google” to check out the images.

This sculpture consists of fiberglass and steel, and it rises 60 feet out of the ground and covers 140 feet of the 1,000 square foot park.

“These urban pieces are treated like something that’s hit the city,” Oldenburg told The S.F. Chronicle (12/23/2002).  “At first there’s the man-in-the-street opinion, but then there’s the more nuanced response. We don’t copy the objects we use, we try to transform them and we hope they go on transforming as you look at them. The idea of endless public dialogue — visual dialogue — is very important to us.”

Needless to say, their bow and arrow hit the mark as far as public dialogue.  As you walk by this brilliant piece of art, you will often hear tourists and residents talk about it and what it might mean.

As more and more people fall in love with this magical city, this modern-day Atlantis, it should come as no surprise that this is the place that Cupid chooses to keep his bow and arrow.

Cheers!

Mike

Comments Off on “Cupid’s Span”

Filed under San Francisco, San Francisco Architecture, San Francisco Art, San Francisco Tourist

Global Warming Threat

The reclaimed lands are marked in pink.

Everyone who lives in or near San Francisco is very aware of the threat of global warming.  For example, if you talk to someone from Alameda, you realize that they definitely take the prospect of global warming and the rise of the sea seriously.  Alameda, on average, sits only 4 feet above sea level, and any rise of the bay/sea is going to be catastrophic for this historic village positioned on two islands in the bay.

The City of San Francisco also has reason to be alarmed about the sea level.  There are large portions of this city that were reclaimed from the bay.  The founding fathers often used parts of abandoned ships, sand from the tops of hills, and whatever they had in order to fill in the marshes, the inlets, and small creaks near the bay to make more usable land.  In the past, entrepeneurs paid very high prices for land that was actually covered by the bay.  They then would cheaply fill it in and make large profits selling off prime bay front property.  It’s amazing to look at the old maps and realize how much land was actually reclaimed and in use today.  For example, Mission Bay used to be a rather large bay, but now it is just the size of a small creek surrounded by mid-rise apartments/condos, AT&T Park, and the newly developed campus of UCSF.  As the sea level, and bay level, rise, these parts will once again be underwater unless something is done in the next 100 years.

At some point we have to take the blinders off our eyes and admit that global warming is real.  Imagine, there are still people, often brainwashed by their preachers or politicians, who say they don’t believe in global warming.  Is it really that hard to believe when we already see proof around the world of the effect of the polar ice caps melting?  Only when we are able to face this problem head on will we be able to formulate long-term solutions and save the land through the use of levees and dykes.  If they could do it in new Orleans they can do it in San Francisco, but now is the time for action.  Ignorance at times may be bliss, but in this instance it is short-sighted, ludicrous, and dangerous.

Mike

Comments Off on Global Warming Threat

Filed under California, San Francisco, San Francisco History, San Francisco Living, San Francisco Nature, Uncategorized

Happy Anniversary

I recently celebrated an anniversary.  On the evening of August 22, 2009, I drove into San Francisco and began my love affair with this city.  It had been a long day of driving all the way from Portland, Oregon with a very shaky and upset kitty sitting beside me, stretching across my lap, laying on my shoulders, hiding under the seat, and snuggling up to my legs while I drove for ten hours.  To top it all off, I was stuck in miles of traffic trying to get across the Bay Bridge. We went out to eat at Saint Francis Cafe that evening, and then snuggled in our new loft to watch the stars through the skylights.

There have been ups and downs, trials and rewards, but overall San Francisco has been a great place to live.  It feels like home in a way that I have never felt before.  I am not a visitor here, and I am not out-of-place at all.  This city accepts everyone just they way they are.  I don’t know why anyone would want to leave here.

Here is to 2 years in San Francisco, and a hope and wish for many more to come.

Cheers!

Mike

Comments Off on Happy Anniversary

Filed under San Francisco Living, Uncategorized

The Ghoulish Statues of 580 California Street

The next time you are in the neighborhood of California and Kearny, look up.  You will see three ghoulish looking, grim reaper like statues appearing to stare out at this mythical city by the sea.  Were they put there like gargoyles to scare away evil spirits?  Are they a sign of human, and city mortality?

Unfortunately, the real answer is not romantic or whimsical.  These statues were created by Murial Castanis, and the formal title for these artistic statues is “Three Models for 580 California,” but they are more commonly known as the “Corporate Goddesses.”

There must be more story behind the creation of these statues, but at this point it has not been published, and the artist passed away a few years ago.  It does make you wonder what story future generations may attach to these medieval ladies.

Cheers!

Mike

Comments Off on The Ghoulish Statues of 580 California Street

Filed under San Francisco Architecture, San Francisco Art