Native Americans in San Francisco

Raymond Dabb Yelland, Lands End, San Francisco, CA

As with the rest of the United States, we are not the first to inhabit this peninsula.  The first  people to call this home, at least the first as far as we can tell, were the Native Americans.  Imagine if you will a San Francisco composed of sand dunes, marshes, and wetlands.  A place of relative peace and calm which migrating birds often called home during at least some part of the year.  The swamps were rich with life and clean, truly clean, water was abundant.  This of course was before the gold miners of 1849 dumped large quantities of mercury into the streams and rivers.

This virtual paradise was inhabited by many, many tribes which appear to have gotten along in relative peace.  Each tribe, numbering from 40 – 400 had a territory where they hunted, fished, and collected all that they needed.  The area was so rich in resources that the tribe’s needs were easily satisfied.

It is estimated that around 17,000 Native Americans called the bay area home for many centuries, possibly even dating back to a time long ago when the shores of San Francisco started at the Faralon Islands and the bay was a beautiful meadow.  Some of the tribe names are listed below:

Yelamu Tribe – San Francisco area

Humen Tribe – Marin area

Huchium Tribe – Oakland area

Aramai Tribe – Daly City area

Urebure Tribe – San Bruno area

What will the bay area look like in 1,000 or 2,000 or even 3,000 years?  Will the future inhabitants remember us?  What will they think our name was and how will these future historians think that we lived?  Let your imagination go for just a moment, and imagine that they are actually alien archeologists studying the earth and trying to figure out its past and how people lived and survived in San Francisco during the early 21st Century.

Cheers!

Mike

Source:  Infinite City:  A San Francisco Atlas, by Rebecca Solnit (If you are into San Francisco history, you need to buy this book.)

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