S.F. History: Crocker’s Crime

The fence is located behind the center building.  

Charles Crocker was one of the “Associates,” also called the “Big Four.”  He shared this title with Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Leland Stanford.  All in someway played a role in the creation of the Central Pacific Railroad, and all of them amassed huge fortunes and built mansions to reflect this on Nob Hill.

Crocker built his opulent Victorian mansion very close to a modest house which stood at the corner of Sacramento and Taylor Street.  This was the residence of Nicholas Yung.  Crocker decided he wanted that lot and began plans to tear it to the ground, but the Yung’s would not sell.  Crocker then decided to build a 40 foot fence around the Yung house on three sides and cut off the air and sunlight.  Eventually Yung did sell, and Crocker tore the residence down.

How did the public feel about this aggressive display of wealth and power?  I think the answer lies in the fact that the 40 foot fence became known as “Crocker’s Crime.”

– Mike

Advertisements

Comments Off on S.F. History: Crocker’s Crime

Filed under San Francisco History

Comments are closed.